Genuine equality means not treating everyone the same, but attending equally to everyone’s different needs.

Eagleton, Terry, Why Marx Was Right (Yale University Press, 2011) p.5 (via fuckyeahdialectics)

And this is why I get pissed off when.. I talk about equality, and someone says “YOU WANT EVERYONE TO BE THE SAME”.  No, that’s not how it works, and I’m sick of explaining it.

(via cissexuals)

(via syruponsausage)

wnderlst:

Columbia River Gorge, Oregon | Ray Green

You are a
hurricane of
a girl;

remember
to breathe
every once

in a while,
do not drown
within your
own storm.


(via seabelle)

(Source: stolenwine, via myperfectpreppyworld)


radn:

catspring:

i don’t get why we need driver’s training. driving is just like mario kart except slower and you can’t throw blue shells at people

please never drive

(Source: petalnoseremade99, via stability)


peppersongg:

teenage girls are awesome pass it on

(via feminismandpugsarelife)

As a species, humans manifest a quality called neoteny, the retention of juvenile characteristics into adulthood. Neoteny has physical ramifications—scarce body hair and a flat face are two examples—but it also has neurological ones. Namely, we have an extraordinary capacity to continue learning throughout life. If neoteny helps to explain our ability to learn, researchers are now figuring out what drives us to take advantage of it. In 2008, a group of scientists set up a novel fMRI study. When a sub­ject’s curiosity was piqued by a question (“What is the only country in the world that has a bill of rights for cows?” for instance), certain regions of the brain lit up. Those areas, known collectively as the basal ganglia, correspond to the brain’s reward centers—the same ones that govern our desire for sex or chocolate or total domination in Call of Duty 4. When people say they have an itch to figure something out, they’re not speaking metaphorically. They’re looking to get high on information. Curiosity, then, is not some romantic quality. It is an adaptive response. Humans may not be the fastest or strongest creatures, but through the blind luck of evolution, we developed the desire and capacity to continually update our understanding of the world. And that has allowed us to master it—or get darn close.

— The Editor’s Letter From The April 2014 Issue Of Popular Science Magazine | Popular Science (via alec-c-c-combo-breaker)

Woah, I’m literally writing a term paper on neoteny. This will probably be helpful. Thank you Tumblr.

(via pantalanagapompous)

(via lifestyleofapreppygaykid)

ohyestheyfuckingdo:

nicrememiralleggro:

annappley:

And then I finished it, because I am a crazyperson who doesn’t need sleep.

LOVE THIS!

This is wonderful!

justtouchedawkwardly:

first i was afraid

image

(via srushtinator)


tawnks:

the one thing that has stuck with me every day since my English teacher told me it in middle school is:

"When referring to someone, always say who they are before anything else about them, because being a person always comes first"

Instead of saying “the mentally ill man,” say “the man with a mental illness”

Putting someone’s characteristics (especially negative ones) before them is dehumanizing and rude. Don’t do it.

(via whatsupmakelove)


hamsterangst:

WHENEVER I TOUCH CEILINGS I FEEL REALLY POWERFUL

(via dutchster)

finesweatingmoon:

#her stylist should be elected president of fashion
tarassein:

stunningpicture:

Lions pretend to be hurt by the bites of their young to encourage them.

this put the biggest smile on my face